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7 Card Stud Rules

Possibly the most well-known online poker game in the world, is the classic 7 Card Stud. It may be easy to learn but it can take a lifetime to master. In 7 Card Stud, players are dealt seven cards throughout the course of the hand, but only the best five-card hand possible for each player is used to determine the winner. Before a game of 7 Card Stud can begin, all players ante a nominal amount. Each player is dealt two hidden hole cards and one exposed card. The player with the lowest exposed card is the "bring-in", and is forced to make a wager of either a half of a small bet or a full small bet (e.g. either $1 or $2 in a $2/$4 game). The course of play continues clockwise around the table until betting is complete for the round.

Note: For the purose of determining the bring-in, ties in card rank are broken by suit, with spades being the highest, then hearts, diamonds and lastly clubs.

Another exposed card, known as the "Fourth Street", is now dealt to each player. The person holding the card with the highest poker value goes first. This player can either check or bet. If there are no pairs among the exposed cards, the bet will be a small bet (e.g. $2 in a $2/$4 game). However, if any player happens to show a pair, the betting can be opened to a big bet (e.g. $4 in a $2/$4 game).

Another exposed card, known as the "Fifth Street", is now dealt to each player. Again, the person with the card holding the highest poker value goes first.

Note: Starting on Fifth Street and for the rest of the hand, all bets are in big bet increments ($4 in a $2/$4 game).

Now another exposed card, known as the "Sixth Street", is dealt to each player. Again, the person with the card holding the highest poker value goes first.

After each player has received their first six cards and placed their corresponding bets, a seventh and final card is dealt to each player face-down keeping it a secret to everyone at the table but the player himself. Here, the player whose exposed cards have the highest poker value goes first.

If there is more than one remaining player when the final betting round is complete, the last bettor or raiser shows his or her cards. If there was no bet on the final round, the player whose exposed cards have the highest poker value shows his or her cards first.

The player that has the best five-card hand wins the pot. In the event of a tie, the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands.

After the pot is awarded, a new game of 7 Card Stud is ready to begin.

7 Card Stud Hi/Lo

7 Card Stud Hi/Lo is a technically demanding game, in which the best poker hands for high and low split the pot at showdown. Players are dealt seven cards throughout the course of the game but only the best five-card hand possible for each player is used to determine the winner. Note that 7 Card Stud Hi/Lo is played with an "eight or better" qualifier, which means that a hand must be at least an eight to be eligible to win the low portion of the pot. Before a game of 7 Card Stud Hi/Lo can begin, all players ante a nominal amount just as they would in a regular 7 Card Stud game. Each player is dealt the same two hidden hole cards and one exposed card and the same ranking rules apply to begin the bets.

The same rounds are played in the Hi/Lo version including “Fourth Street”, “Fifth Street”, etc. and they all follow the same guidelines as they would in the regular version of the game, which includes the same betting rules.

Everything is done the same as the regular 7 Card Stud game, only when it comes to the showdown in the Hi/Lo game, the player with the best five-card hand for high wins half the pot, and the player with the best hand for low, wins the other half. In the event that no hand qualifies for low, the best hand(s) for high wins the pot.

After the pot is awarded, a new game of 7 Card Stud Hi/Lo is ready to begin.

 
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