Home Add to favorites
Poker Strategies Poker Blog
 
Online Poker Labs Online Poker Labs
Poker Blog   Video Lessons
 
Poker Basics
Poker Types
Poker Psychology

Omaha & Omaha Hi/Lo Basics

Omaha is an exciting poker game derived from Texas Hold 'em. Each player is dealt four cards (known as the "hole cards") that are for that player only. Just like in Texas Hold’em, five community cards are dealt face-up on the "board". The difference is that in this game all of the players use three of the five community cards together with two of their hole cards to make the best five-card poker hand they possibly can. In Omaha, "the button" is still the indicator of which player is to be the nominal dealer for the current game. The rules are the same as Texas Hold’em and have the same small blinds and big blinds. When each player has received their four hole cards, betting can start around the table beginning with the player to the left of the big blind.

The rhythm of an Omaha game is the same as the Texas Hold’em game and has the same rules for betting includes the same flop, turn, and river rounds.

As in Texas Hold’em, if there is more than one remaining player when the final betting round is complete, the last bettor or raiser shows his or her cards. If there was no bet on the final round, the player to the left of the button shows his or her cards first. In Omaha, players must use two and only two of their four hole cards in combination with three cards from the board. In the event of a tie, the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands. After the pot is awarded, a new game of Omaha is ready to begin. The button now moves clockwise to the next player.

Omaha Hi/Lo

Known for its frequently large pots, Omaha Hi/Lo has quickly become an extremely popular game in North America and Europe. Each player in an Omaha Hi/Lo game is dealt four cards (known as the "hole cards") just as they would in a regular Omaha game. The same rules for Omaha apply to Omaha Hi/Lo. The only difference is how the pot is handled. In Omaha Hi/Lo, the pot is divided between the best hand for high and the best hand for low. Note that Omaha Hi/Lo is played with an "eight or better" qualifier, which means that a hand must be at least an eight to be eligible to win the low portion of the pot. The same circle, known as "the button", serves to indicate which player is the nominal dealer for that current game. Bets are placed as they would in a regular Omaha game and the game begins just as it would if you were playing Omaha.Rounds are all the same in Omaha Hi/Lo and abide by the same betting rules as Omaha and Texas Hold’em games.  

In Omaha Hi/Lo, just like in regular Omaha and Texas Hold’em, if there is more than one remaining player when the final betting round is complete, the last bettor or raiser shows his or her cards. If there was no bet on the final round, the player to the left of the button shows his or her cards first. The player with the best five-card hand for high wins half the pot, and the player with the best hand for low, wins the other half. In Omaha Hi/Lo, players are also only allowed to use two of their four hole cards in combination with three cards from the board. In the event of a tie, the high and low shares of the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands. In the event that no hand qualifies for low, the best hand(s) for high win the pot. After the pot is awarded, a new game of Omaha Hi/Lo is ready to begin. The button now moves clockwise to the next player.

 
Poker Blog | Poker Room Reviews | Video Lessons | Tournaments   |   Freerolls